Shefford

Discover Shefford, Quebec: A Blend of History and Natural Beauty

Shefford, Quebec is a charming township municipality nestled in the province of Quebec. It is a part of the Haute-Yamaska Regional County Municipality within the administrative area of Estrie. The township is unique in that it completely encircles the city of Waterloo. As of the Canada 2021 Census, Shefford is home to 7,253 residents, making it a cozy and welcoming community.

Shefford, Quebec: A Snapshot of Demographics

In the 2021 Census of Population conducted by Statistics Canada, Shefford, Quebec reported a population of 7,253. These residents were living in 2,909 out of its 3,095 total private dwellings. This represented a population growth of 4.4% from its 2016 population of 6,947.

The township spans a land area of 117.99 km2 (45.56 sq mi), resulting in a population density of 61.5/km2 (159.2/sq mi) in 2021. This provides a balance of community and open space, allowing residents and visitors alike to enjoy both the social and natural offerings of Shefford.

Language Diversity in Shefford, Quebec

The linguistic landscape of Shefford, Quebec is diverse and vibrant. According to the 2006 Census, the township boasts a variety of mother tongue languages. This linguistic diversity contributes to the rich cultural tapestry of Shefford, making it a fascinating destination for history and culture enthusiasts.

Population Trends in Shefford, Quebec

Shefford, Quebec has experienced steady population growth over the years. The 4.4% increase from 2016 to 2021 is a testament to the township's appeal as a place to live and visit. The trend suggests a thriving community that continues to attract new residents and visitors with its unique blend of history, culture, and natural beauty.

In conclusion, Shefford, Quebec is a township that offers a rich history, a diverse community, and stunning natural landscapes. Whether you're a history buff, a nature lover, or someone looking for a welcoming community, Shefford, Quebec has something to offer.

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