Edmonton

Discover Edmonton, Alberta: A Blend of History and Modernity

Edmonton, Alberta, is a city that beautifully combines the old and the new. As the capital city of the Canadian province of Alberta, Edmonton is a cultural, governmental, and educational hub. It is the northernmost city in North America with a population of over one million, making it a significant metropolitan area. This article will take you on a journey through Edmonton's rich history, vibrant culture, and stunning geography.

The Origin of Edmonton, Alberta

Edmonton, Alberta, was first inhabited by several First Nations peoples, including those of Algonquian, Athabaskan, and Siouan origin. These peoples and their ancestors have inhabited the area of the modern city since the end of the last glacial period, perhaps as early as 12,000 BC. The city was also a historic site for the Métis, who held many narrow lots along the North Saskatchewan River, providing access to many resources in the area.

The city's name, Edmonton, derives from Adelmetone, meaning 'farmstead/estate of Ēadhelm' (from Ēadhelm, an Old English personal name, and tūn). This earlier form of the name appears in the Domesday Book of 1086. Indigenous languages refer to the Edmonton area by multiple names, which reference the presence of fur trading posts. In Cree, the area is known as ᐊᒥᐢᑿᒌᐚᐢᑲᐦᐃᑲᐣ amiskwacîwâskahikan, which translates to "Beaver Hills House."

A Glimpse into the History of Edmonton, Alberta

The earliest known inhabitants arrived in the area that is now Edmonton around 3,000 BC. The site of present-day Edmonton was home to several First Nations peoples, including the Cree, Nakota Sioux, Blackfoot, Tsuut'ina, Ojibwe, and Denesuline. The valley of the North Saskatchewan River, in particular, was settled to varying degrees for thousands of years, providing many essential resources.

Edmonton's historic growth as a city has been facilitated through the absorption of five adjacent urban municipalities and a series of annexations. Known as the "Gateway to the North,"

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